Lost Souls

Merih Akoğul

Merih Akoğul

Merih Akoğul

Merih Akoğul

He was born in Istanbul in 1963. He graduated from Mimar Sinan University Faculty of Fine Arts, Photography Main Art Branch (Undergraduate) in 1985, and Marmara University Fine Arts Institute Photography Main Art Branch (Master's Degree) in 2001. Merih Akoğul has published 14 books on different subjects, opened more than 30 photo exhibitions in Turkey and around the world, he also has participated in group exhibitions. He worked on photography art and theory. He curated 11 exhibitions. Merih Akoğul, who is a member of the Advisory Board of Istanbul Modern Museum Photography Department, is also an instructor at Mimar Sinan Fine Arts University. Since 2010, he has been the editor of Eczacıbaşı Photography Artists Series.

When we look closely at our environment in our daily life, we see animals everywhere, from football teams to corporate emblems, from children's toys to symbols of the states. From fairy tales to cartoons, our entire childhood was shaped by stories about animals. La Fontaine's "Crow and the Fox" and Caykovski's "Swan Lake" also points to us the existence of a brand new route through photographs, between the "Animal World" and the world we live in.  Animals leaded many discoveries in human history. Civilization has reached these points as a result of wishing to fly like birds, run like antelopes, and swim like fish.

In the chaos of daily life in various countries of the world, all kinds of animals, their images or symbols representing them from Turkey and around the World were photographed in this work. Streets, houses, museums, art galleries, zoos became the natural plateaus of this work. The result was irrefutable proof of the existence of a natural relationship between the past and the present, and between reality and the visible, just as in the art of photography.

We always have to prevent a belief that every photograph of animals and their traces will help the lost souls of our finite universe that come and go between the cosmos and chaos.

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